A much delayed publication!

Two and a half months after completing From the Cave Wall: A Stone Age Story, I have finally completed and uploaded the accompanying non-fiction ebook.

A sneak peek!

This is available when lovely readers sign up to my readers’ club: The Source Detectives!

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It feels strange to be completely finished with The Stone Age, but now I can properly move on to looking at The Iron Age.

Soon I can introduce you lovely blog readers to Arlo and we can begin to learn what it was like to live in an Iceni coastal fort…

Back to it…

Schools are back to work…

Husband is back to work…

So I am back to work…

It’s been a lovely few weeks of summer. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the sunshine, time with family and friends and generally the opportunity to “switch off” temporarily. It has meant that certain ‘work’ has not been done, but I feel relaxed and rested!

And so we have reached September and must focus on what is to come in the next few months. My creative brain is whizzing with ideas and sparking with concepts – I walk around with a my hair on end…ok…not really but I like the image.

Later this week, I will be posting an update on the follow up to From the Cave Wall…

From a Father’s Hands: An Iron Age Story

…Watch this space…

Book promo and Author Visit – Limited time offer!

Teachers!

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The dilemma of the indie book writer v reviewer…

I realise that I have been a little quiet for the last week or so and for that I apologise. It had been my intention to publish at least one blog post a week and I haven’t been entirely successful in this. For that, I apologise.

So why have I felt unable to post?

The answer lies in my blog addition of book reviews. I am thrilled with the positive response that TIBC has had. Lots of people have been keen for me to review their books and I have been happily reading some excellent ones. My dilemma rises from when the books are not excellent but could have been had they been subjected to rigorous editing and PROOFREADING!

Publishing a book takes time. It takes money too, but if you are on a tight budget paying for a proof-reader can seem an unnecessary expense. I get that. I didn’t pay to have my book proof-read, but I am very lucky to be surrounded by people who I could rely on to read my book and point out where there was a glaring missing full stop or speech mark. Leaving them aside however, I read and reread my book almost 100 times in the last 3 months or so, checking and rechecking the basics to ensure that I wasn’t submitting something with glaring errors.

I adore reading but I cannot read a book which is littered with errors, leaving aside any problems with the plot itself. In addition, as a reviewer of books for children, on a blog which is aimed at parents and children who want to read my books above all else, I am not going to be promoting books which in my view are unfinished. That is certainly not the self-promotion I want.

Self or indie publishing (whichever way you want to phrase it) is incredibly easy to do and monstrously difficult to succeed at. We are seen as the rejects who couldn’t get book deals and the perception is our books are littered with errors and lacking in cohesive plot or believable characters. These are unfair sweeping statements that hinder the indie author before they have even published their book. I’m guilty of it too, before I started this process, I looked down on self-publishing and would avoid purchasing books from indie authors because of my bias towards them. I now know how passionate, talented and dedicated to their craft many indie authors are. I have read some brilliant self published works which any sensible agent/publisher should jump on. Given all this, it is depressing and frustrating to read a book which matches the stereotype and fails to meet my expectations.

My dilemma then has very much been how to address this. I am not going to write a public review but I also recognise that despite my frustration, I cannot leave a fellow author without any kind of feedback. My response was to respond in email with apologies and explanation as to why it wouldn’t be appearing here. I’m not sure what else I could do?

It is the first time but I’m sure won’t be the last.

Please comment down below,

Are you a book blogger? What do you do when faced with this situation? Do you think I did the right thing? How do we tackle this bias against self-publishing?

If this rant got you intrigued, you can find my book…here!

If you want to read a review of an excellently written and proof-read indie book for children, TIBC #1: Trouble with Parsnips, Laurel Decher